“I finally got a copywriting client!”

You ask questions and find out what the client expects of you!

What format do you write in? What are you responsible for?

  1. What is expected of you?
  2. How does the client define success?
  3. What format do they want?
  4. Do they want to be hands on or hands off with the project?
  5. How can you prevent “scope creep?”

You always want to know what the client wants.

How does the client define success?

What format do they want?

Do they want to be hands on or hands off with the project?

How can you prevent scope creep?

BONUS: Am I responsible for designing stuff?

Here’s an example using the legendary John Carlton:

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I currently write copy for a 7-figure business and freelance on the side. Most of the time you can find me wearing plain white T-Shirts and eating raw garlic.

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Andrew Trachtman

Andrew Trachtman

I currently write copy for a 7-figure business and freelance on the side. Most of the time you can find me wearing plain white T-Shirts and eating raw garlic.

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