How to quickly write HUNDREDS of ads FAST with “Modular Copy”

DALL-E tried it’s best, but as someone who draws on occasion… HANDS ARE HARD.

Look, this idea isn’t revolutionary, but it’s powerful.

If you want to write more ads in less time…

Have more chances to find a winning idea…

And if you want to model VShred (which you should. They’re massively successful)…

Then congratulations my friend, Modular Copy™ is just what you’re looking for.

“Modular Copy™” is just my way of describing the idea of keeping sections of copy isolated from one another.

So if you pretend you’re about to write 3 Facebook ads, here’s how most people would go about it:

  1. Write the ad.

Well dang, that was simple, right?

But it wasn’t super efficient.

So maybe you end up with an ad like this one:

“Are you a new copywriter looking to kickstart your career but feeling overwhelmed by the thought of getting your first clients? Look no further! Our copywriting program is specifically designed for beginners with zero experience.

You’ll learn the ins and outs of copywriting, including how to craft compelling headlines, write persuasive sales copy, and create content that connects with your target audience. But that’s not all, our program also teaches you how to market yourself and find clients even with zero experience.

Don’t let a lack of experience hold you back from starting your dream career. Sign up for our copywriting program today and start getting your first clients in no time! Limited spots available, so hurry and enroll now!”

  • Credit to ChatGPT for that example ad — Don’t worry, the rest will be me writing the ads. I just wanted a quick example to work with.

Okay, so… now you have to write a totally fresh, new ad, right?

Don’t be so sure. 😉

This is where Modular Copy™ saves the day! (or at least, more of your day)

Instead of that ad above which is tightly intertwined…

You can pull out specific sections and make them into their own little independent “blocks.”

And since showing beats telling in this case, here you go:

HOOKS:

I pulled these hooks out of the copy that ChatGPT wrote, but you can do this by just… writing copy and then seeing what parts are interesting. Then you just pull them out and create hooks.

Hook 1: Are you a new copywriter who feels overwhelmed?

Hook 2: 90% of new copywriters can’t get clients because of the “portfolio paradox.”

Hook 3: Wanted: Motivated copywriters with zero experience.

BODY:

Now you’ll want to write the “meat” of your copy.

This is the “body” section where you do most of your explaining and teasing. You can do multiple bodies, but to keep this example short, I’ll just write one.

BODY 1: For anyone who wants to become a highly paid copywriter (that no one wants to compete with), then look no further.

My copywriting program was built from the ground up to practically guarantee that every beginner who takes it leaves with a client under their belt.

You’ll learn the ins and outs of copywriting, the most common shortcuts, templates, formulas, and even how to do research “the right way” so you never suffer from writer’s block ever again!

TRANSITION:

Now that you know where your copy starts (the hook) and where it needs to go (the body) you can connect the two.

It’s like putting a head on a neck. You’re connecting one idea to another and making it as seamless as possible.

Sometimes one word sounds better than another, or maybe 2 hooks are wildly different.

So the only way to attach different hooks to the same “body” is by having transition lines.

You’ll want to look at the last line of the hook and the first line of the body while you’re doing this. Line your copy up the way I do below:

Hook 1: Almost all new copywriters feel overwhelmed… and it’s all because of one silly mistake they make without even knowing it.

Hook 2: 90% of new copywriters can’t get clients because of the “portfolio paradox.”

Hook 3: Wanted: Motivated copywriters with zero experience.

BODY 1: For anyone who wants to become a highly paid copywriter (that no one wants to compete with), then look no further.

And then find ways to seamlessly transition from the hook to the body.

TRANSITION 1 (for Hook 1): And in fact, this “mistake” has nothing to do with your writing ability!

It all comes down to something I like to call “the invisible flatliner” and it repels good clients like bad breath on a first date.

And copywriters who don’t solve this issue never get clients.

But here’s the thing… it’s actually a really simple problem with an even simpler solution.

So…

TRANSITION 2 (for Hook 2 + Hook 3): See, lots of new copywriters seem to believe that you need a portfolio to get clients… but you need clients to get a portfolio.

But that’s just NOT TRUE!

In fact…

CALL TO ACTION (CTA):

And lastly, the CTA which tells people where to go, what to click, or what awaits them on the next leg of their journey.

I’m not going to go too crazy with these just to show you the value of being able to mix and match pieces of copy, but you COULD have wildly different CTAs and transitions from the Body to the CTA as well.

This is good if you want to test running an ad to multiple offers.

CTA1: If that sounds good, then all it takes is one click to get started. Check out my free B.E.S.T. Copywriting Method on the next page.

CTA2: If that sounds good, then all it takes is a single click to get started. Join my email list on the next page.

CTA3: If that sounds good, then all it takes is a single click to get started. See if you qualify to join my Copywriting Inner Circle on the next page.

And now that you’re done assembling the pieces, now it’s time to build the Lego Death Star!

…or something like that.

Here’s all you need to do now (even if you’re working with video editors):

VERSIONS:

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 1

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 2
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 2
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 2

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 3
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 3
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 3

All you need to do to make sure you cover all of your versions is go top down.

Start with all of your hooks.

Hook 1, Hook 2, Hook 3.

Then attach all of the possible transitions to each (I kept the number of transitions small and simple).

Hook 1 + Transition 1 (the only one that works with Hook 1)

Hook 2 + Transition 2 (the one that works with Hooks 2 and 3)

Hook 3 + Transition 2

Then attach all of the bodies to each possible hook and transition combo:

(I’ll pretend I wrote 3 bodies here just to illustrate the process — Notice how each additional “section” or “copy block” adds exponentially more combinations)

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 2
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 3

Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 2
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 3

Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 2
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 3

And then you’d do the same thing for the CTAs!

(notice how I grouped these versions to illustrate how you can chunk down which versions you still need to account for)

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 2 + CTA 1
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 3 + CTA 1

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 2
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 2 + CTA 2
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 3 + CTA 2

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 3
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 2 + CTA 3
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 3 + CTA 3

Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 2 + CTA 1
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 3 + CTA 1

Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 2
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 2 + CTA 2
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 3 + CTA 2

Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 3
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 2 + CTA 3
Hook 2 + Transition 2 + Body 3 + CTA 3

Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 2 + CTA 1
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 3 + CTA 1

Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 2
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 2 + CTA 2
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 3 + CTA 2

Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 1 + CTA 3
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 2 + CTA 3
Hook 3 + Transition 2 + Body 3 + CTA 3

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1

And also, this is WAY EASIER in Google Docs because you can skip to different “title sections.”

On Windows, just highlight your “section text” like HOOKS, BODY, CTA, etc. and press Ctrl + Alt + 1 to create a big title. It makes life so much easier.

But yeah.

You can end up with an absurd number of ads to test pretty quickly.

But here’s the caveat and the “80/20” of this whole lesson…

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS YOUR HOOK.

TEST YOUR HOOKS FIRST.

So I tend to start off writing copy however. I just write it.

Then I pick out the most interesting parts and bring them to the top as hooks (since more people see the hook than the body or the CTA.)

Testing priority is always TOP DOWN.

Stuff at the top of the page is more important than stuff at the bottom

(IGNORING the hypothesis that people immediately scroll to the bottom of sales letters which is valid, but not always true. That’s another article for another time…)

So in reality, I’d usually do something more like:

Hook 1, Hook 2, Hook 3, etc.

And I’d have ONE BODY and ONE CTA.

I’d keep the rest static to test the hooks by themselves, and if necessary, I’d add transitions. But ideally, you’d have a “universal transition” that works for all of the hooks attached to the start of the body.

Things don’t always work out that way, but hey. Adding some reusable transitions it’s terrible and it‘s worth it if it makes the copy read better.

Here’s what it would look like:

Hook 1 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 2 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 3 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 4 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
Hook 5 + Transition 1 + Body 1 + CTA 1
…etc.

And then I’d test the hooks.

Whichever hook wins, I’d go deeper with.

I’d start making the body more specific to the hook and changing only the body section.

And then I might only change the CTA and test the offer (because the ad is easier to imagine as a separate unit from the offer itself).

There’s obviously other tests and dimensions of copy — like the visuals and the audio, etc. but hey. This is already a pretty dense article.

So, hopefully you enjoyed that and found it useful.

If you did, let me know.

If you didn’t, let me know.

This stuff can be confusing and if I can help clear it up, I will.

  • Andrew

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Andrew Trachtman

I currently write copy for multiple 7 and 8-figure business and freelance on the side when I have free time (which is... not that often).